Conference Experiences: Vaughan Hennen

It is hard to comprehend how much I have learned in the past months about music librarianship and art librarianship.  From March 2-5 2016, I attended the Music Librarian Association conference in Cincinnati, Ohio and from the 8th to the 12th I attended the joint ARLIS/VRA conference in Seattle, Washington.
Both conferences exposed me to many different areas of librarianship and helped me connect with both students and professionals.  The conferences reignited my passion for librarianship and gave me tons of new ideas for outreach and programming.

It was evident that the attendees of both conferences are advocates and defenders of the “common good” in libraries and society.

Music Library Association (MLA) Conference – Cincinnati, OH – March 2016

The MLA conference taught me a lot about networking and what other schools are doing to promote access to their unique and diverse collections.  The association is trying to become more “diverse” – there were great open discussions about what “diversity” means and how to create and foster a “diverse” library. The discussions in the committee meetings and round tables were enlightening and made me realize the profound amount of respect many librarians have for their counterparts.

Through the great musicianship of the performers at the conference, I found a spark to begin playing cello on a regular basis again.  It was great being in a group of people who are passionate about music scholarship, stewardship, and performance.  I never realized that MLA had so many wonderful musicians in its ranks!

My mentor for the conference was Leslie Anderson. She is a hoot, to say the least!  It was nice to see a familiar face after meeting dozens of strangers and nodding and smiling all of the time.  At times, I want to be like April Ludgate (Parks and Recreation) and run away from the onslaught of people.

I attended so many enlightening sessions!  Three of my favorites during the conference were:

  • “Teaching Performance Based Research Skills: Students Reflections and Experiences” by Kristina Shanton from Ithaca College.
  • “Soulful Sounds of Southwestern Ohio: From King Records to Dayton Funk” — Sponsor: Black Music Collections Round Table and speakers that included: Scott Brown (UCLA), David N. Lewis (WVXU Cincinnati), Brian Powers (Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County)
    • The attendees of this session had the privilege of hearing Otis Williams, the lead singer of The Charms and Philip Paul, a King Record session drummer.
      • Philip Paul was just notified that he will be entering the Jazz hall of fame this year
  • “Digital Curation with OMEKA” led by Anna Kijas (Boston College).

The Digital Curation and Research Skills lectures were especially helpful, as I would like to allow more music to be accessible to patrons.

I met several new student colleagues at MLA, who I will most likely be interacting and collaborating with for the rest of my professional career.  We had a great time getting to know each other’s backgrounds, home institution, and inspiration for pursuing music librarianship.  It was also really fun to get to know the music librarians who I have seen through list-servs and periodical articles.

While at MLA, the Contemporary Art Center had an exhibition of Robert Mapplethorpe titled “After The Moment: Reflections on Robert Mapplethorpe”.  This amazing exhibition celebrated the 25th anniversary of the CAC’s exhibition of Mapplethorpe’s The Perfect Moment.  The show featured responses to CAC’s hosting of The Perfect Moment, both for and against — many of the responses against were very intense and showed the ripe chord that this show struck with many conservatives in the area.

Do Ho Suh was also being exhibited at CAC – his works are seen below – they had huge structures made of translucent materials!

Check out CAC’s web archive of every exhibition that has been at the Center since 1939!!

Pictures of the CAC’s exhibition of Do Ho Suh

The CAC had a great outreach and program to get patrons into the museum!  –Drink and Draw, where people can come, purchase drinks and draw!  This is a great idea for a library – maybe we could replace the alcohol with a themed drink like a V8 or smoothies.

 

Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) and Visual Resources Association (VRA) Joint Conference Seattle, WA – March 2016

The ARLIS/VRA was an amazing experience and made me happy that I am taking myself out of my comfort zone to learn about art and art librarianship.  There are so many facets of art librarianship and visual resources that it is sometimes overwhelming for an art novice.

ARLIS exposed me to a group of amazing individuals who are greatly invested in making materials more accessible and better utilized.

The Graphic Novel Special Interest Group (SIG), GLBTQ SIG, and Fashion, Textile, and Costumes SIG were AMAZING!  The SIG meetings allowed me to meet people who share my interests and discuss issues that we both care about.  My friend and colleague, Andrew Wang, presented at the Graphic Novel SIG and presented a poster about Zine cataloging!  He is a great role model for art librarianship students!

The GLBTQ Special Interest Group presentation allowed attendees to learn about the great programs that center around GLBTQ issues in Seattle.  The presenters included representatives from Gay City, Seattle Public Library, University of Portland Archive.

Fashion has always been fascinating to me – when I was a kid I wanted to be a fashion designer!  This was the first time that I got to discuss with scholars in the field and learn more about the textile facet of art librarianship.  Coming from a music background, all of this stuff is VERY new.

Here are some pictures of the closing reception at the Seattle Public Library.  Plus some fun pictures of Kendra Werst, Andrew Wang, and I.

Future Thinking

I believe it would be beneficial and very eye-opening if VRA and MLA did a joint conference.  Imagine the great ideas that could be fostered with musicians and artists in the same room!  Music librarians are madly trying to digitize musical scores to promote access and preserve the physical artifact.  Visual Resource librarians could help greatly with this process as they have great expertise in digitizing high-quality images.  In many cases when a score is digitized, it is not scanned at a high level and the beautiful cover is not included with the scan.

The Visual Resources librarians can greatly help to link artists to the cover art of scores or albums.

Conference Experiences: Andrew Wang

 

Not having the time to attend ARLIS/NA last year, I was determined to attend the 2016 ARLIS/NA + VRA Joint Conference in Seattle. Although I originally wanted to moderate a session on comics, I was more than happy to present my user study at the Graphic Novels Special Interest Group (of which I am currently a co-moderator) and my zine collection project at the Poster Presentations. Even with the excitement of presenting, the conference was much more than I expected.

For one, it helped put things in perspective and reaffirm my goals. Preoccupied with coursework (especially by the latter half of my program), I often lose sight of the current trends and developments in the field. The conference offered a reprieve. Sessions and workshops ranged from diversity to instruction, public programming to technical services. Some of my favorites were “Scope Drift: New Roles and Responsibilities in Visual Resources,” “E-mania! — The Present and Future of Electronic Art Publishing,” and “Connecting Social Justice to the Workplace: Issues of Diversity in Our Professional Lives.” Being able to hear from current professionals about their recent projects was refreshing since ILS courses tend to be slightly slower in adapting to the latest updates in the practicing field. I think the initiations in proactively promoting diversity, including a “Diversity Forum,” were especially encouraging as they created an open and inclusive environment.

In addition to hearing from professionals, I truly appreciated my opportunities to present to them. My Graphic Novels SIG presentation, titled “User Needs for Art Library Comic Collections,” was a success. As a first time attendee, I felt nervous as one of the new co-moderators and a presenter. My user study, however, complemented my co-moderator Tara Smith’s case study on programming very well and the attendees seemed engaged. Tara and I have discussed collaborating for a publication submission, so it was very helpful to receive constructive feedback. My poster presentation, “Developing and Promoting a New Zine Collection,” also helped me to learn how to sell my story in a condensed amount of time. I managed to meet some great professionals — some curious about starting a zine collection at their own institutions. Networking through presenting helped me feel more confident; I felt like I was exchanging ideas with peers rather than being lectured to in a class.

One of my favorite parts about ARLIS/NA + VRA 2016 was having the opportunity to forge stronger personal connections, in addition to professional connections, with people in the field. To add to my aforementioned networking, I also had the chance to travel with some great peers (fellow SALS members Kendra Werst and Vaughan Hennen), meet and have lunch with my mentor, catch up with my former supervisor/advisor/mentor Kristina Keogh, and even reconnect with the first art librarian I ever talked to about pursuing librarianship, Jill Luedke. I will absolutely be trying my hardest to attend ARLIS in New Orleans and VRA in Louisville next year.

Conference Experiences: Kendra Werst

I attended the New Member’s reception where I was able to connect with several Art Librarian and Visual Resource professionals, some of which I had only known by name. At the Welcome Reception which took place at the Seattle Art Museum, I had the opportunity to meet new and long-standing members, ask questions, and discuss topics relevant to the field and my interests. I also had the chance to reconnect with past supervisors and advisors. At first, the thought of attending this conference as a student was overwhelming but after the first day that thought never came back into my head. I felt very welcomed and accepted by the other professionals and students who were in attendance.

The ArLiSNAP + VREPS Career Development Workshop was very enlightening and provided the opportunity for me meet with other students or recent graduates. I really appreciated listening to Marie Elia, Molly Schoen, and Marsha Taichman discuss their experiences of applying for jobs and living the post-graduate life. The presentations, demonstrations, and open discussions were very encouraging and provided some basic steps to take when a building a career.

The “New Voices in the Profession” was such an amazing session. Listening to the well-developed topics presented by emerging professionals was inspirational. From that session, I thoroughly enjoyed Judith Schwartz’ presentation Visual Literacy Meets Information Literacy: Academic Libraries Address the New Challenges of the 21st Century.

Another session that I am so glad I attended was the Diversity Forum. As a person of mixed race, this topic is very important to me, especially with the lack of diversity within my Masters program. The presenters had the attendees participate in an activity that opened up a personal conversation between about the perceptions of yourself and others. Listening to people from all different backgrounds and walks of life discuss how they have faced diversity and inclusion issues within the profession and the workplace was beyond words. After that session, I walked away with tips on how to move forward with these issues. Some of my fellow peers and I have had discussions on how to incorporate what we learned into the context of library school.