First Thursday Festival

Come color and eat cookies with the Society of Art Librarianship Students at their booth at IU’s First Thursdays festival! We will be selling baked goods, button packs and our zine!

The First Thursdays festival is a celebration of contemporary arts & humanities on the IU Bloomington campus. The festival is free and open to all members of the public, with performances and activities around the Showalter Arts Plaza.

 

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ART//LIB

Check our home-grown zine, ART//LIB!

Note from the editor: 
ART//LIB was conceived as an informal platform for the Society of Art Librarianship Students (SALS) at Indiana University to have a voice without having to grapple with receiving departmental permission. In order to express your opinions in grad school, you’re constantly jumping through hoops or being cautious about stepping on toes. Being a grad student means being on edge all the time because rubbing an administrator, a faculty member, or supervisor the wrong way could mean ending your career before it even begins. 
There are no real parameters for the content of this zine though I have recommended that our contributors keep librarianship, visual resource management, and the arts in mind. Really, this is just an outlet for our organization to make something without being graded or assessed. 

Conference Experiences: Andrew Wang

 

Not having the time to attend ARLIS/NA last year, I was determined to attend the 2016 ARLIS/NA + VRA Joint Conference in Seattle. Although I originally wanted to moderate a session on comics, I was more than happy to present my user study at the Graphic Novels Special Interest Group (of which I am currently a co-moderator) and my zine collection project at the Poster Presentations. Even with the excitement of presenting, the conference was much more than I expected.

For one, it helped put things in perspective and reaffirm my goals. Preoccupied with coursework (especially by the latter half of my program), I often lose sight of the current trends and developments in the field. The conference offered a reprieve. Sessions and workshops ranged from diversity to instruction, public programming to technical services. Some of my favorites were “Scope Drift: New Roles and Responsibilities in Visual Resources,” “E-mania! — The Present and Future of Electronic Art Publishing,” and “Connecting Social Justice to the Workplace: Issues of Diversity in Our Professional Lives.” Being able to hear from current professionals about their recent projects was refreshing since ILS courses tend to be slightly slower in adapting to the latest updates in the practicing field. I think the initiations in proactively promoting diversity, including a “Diversity Forum,” were especially encouraging as they created an open and inclusive environment.

In addition to hearing from professionals, I truly appreciated my opportunities to present to them. My Graphic Novels SIG presentation, titled “User Needs for Art Library Comic Collections,” was a success. As a first time attendee, I felt nervous as one of the new co-moderators and a presenter. My user study, however, complemented my co-moderator Tara Smith’s case study on programming very well and the attendees seemed engaged. Tara and I have discussed collaborating for a publication submission, so it was very helpful to receive constructive feedback. My poster presentation, “Developing and Promoting a New Zine Collection,” also helped me to learn how to sell my story in a condensed amount of time. I managed to meet some great professionals — some curious about starting a zine collection at their own institutions. Networking through presenting helped me feel more confident; I felt like I was exchanging ideas with peers rather than being lectured to in a class.

One of my favorite parts about ARLIS/NA + VRA 2016 was having the opportunity to forge stronger personal connections, in addition to professional connections, with people in the field. To add to my aforementioned networking, I also had the chance to travel with some great peers (fellow SALS members Kendra Werst and Vaughan Hennen), meet and have lunch with my mentor, catch up with my former supervisor/advisor/mentor Kristina Keogh, and even reconnect with the first art librarian I ever talked to about pursuing librarianship, Jill Luedke. I will absolutely be trying my hardest to attend ARLIS in New Orleans and VRA in Louisville next year.

Conference Experiences: Kendra Werst

I attended the New Member’s reception where I was able to connect with several Art Librarian and Visual Resource professionals, some of which I had only known by name. At the Welcome Reception which took place at the Seattle Art Museum, I had the opportunity to meet new and long-standing members, ask questions, and discuss topics relevant to the field and my interests. I also had the chance to reconnect with past supervisors and advisors. At first, the thought of attending this conference as a student was overwhelming but after the first day that thought never came back into my head. I felt very welcomed and accepted by the other professionals and students who were in attendance.

The ArLiSNAP + VREPS Career Development Workshop was very enlightening and provided the opportunity for me meet with other students or recent graduates. I really appreciated listening to Marie Elia, Molly Schoen, and Marsha Taichman discuss their experiences of applying for jobs and living the post-graduate life. The presentations, demonstrations, and open discussions were very encouraging and provided some basic steps to take when a building a career.

The “New Voices in the Profession” was such an amazing session. Listening to the well-developed topics presented by emerging professionals was inspirational. From that session, I thoroughly enjoyed Judith Schwartz’ presentation Visual Literacy Meets Information Literacy: Academic Libraries Address the New Challenges of the 21st Century.

Another session that I am so glad I attended was the Diversity Forum. As a person of mixed race, this topic is very important to me, especially with the lack of diversity within my Masters program. The presenters had the attendees participate in an activity that opened up a personal conversation between about the perceptions of yourself and others. Listening to people from all different backgrounds and walks of life discuss how they have faced diversity and inclusion issues within the profession and the workplace was beyond words. After that session, I walked away with tips on how to move forward with these issues. Some of my fellow peers and I have had discussions on how to incorporate what we learned into the context of library school.

DERAIL forum

Join SALS in the Wells Library – Scholar’s Commons IQ Wall as they virtually attend the

DERAIL (Diversity, Equity, Race, Accessibility, and Identity in LIS) forum.

DERAIL is a student-led event initiated to address the need for critical discussions of the intersections between social justice issues and our roles as students and information professionals. We acknowledge that LIS institutions including academic departments are not neutral in larger discussions of power and privilege, and DERAIL seeks to address the gaps in professional standards and curriculum to recognize how the complexity of our individual and collective identities can work towards equitable information systems, environments, and practices. – Simmons College

Participants of DERAIL will be able to connect to a larger community of students and practitioners engaged in critical LIS work and gain experience presenting research. DERAIL will be held on March 26, 2016, beginning at 10:00 AM (EST) at Simmons College in Boston, MA.

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To find out more visit their website: https://lisedforum.wordpress.com

INDY Trip

SALS went on a day trip to Indianapolis to visit the Indianapolis Art Museum and the Indianapolis Children’s Museum.
We met with Alba Fernández-Keys, a reference librarian at IMA’s Stout Library.
The Stout Reference Library is a non-circulating research collection that is available to IMA staff, docents, students, collectors, researchers, and community members who conduct research on IMA collections and the visual arts in general. The collection of about 100,000 volumes includes books, magazines and journals, auction catalogs, ephemera files, and museum and gallery publications from around the world. The library also subscribes to a number of electronic databases that support art historical and market research. New books are regularly added to our collection.
Alba talked with us about the roots of the IMA and the library, and the way it has changed over the years. SALS members and Alba also discussed topics on the differences of museum and academic librarianship, diversity in the workplace, spatial design and storage and fairness in volunteering and staffing.
Alba also mentioned internships and job opportunities at the IMA and beyond, and it was wonderful to get some career advice from a working art librarian!

IU Art Museum: Behind the Scenes

SALS members teamed up the BGSA (Black Graduate Student Association) for a behind-the-scenes look at the Indiana University’s Art Museum.

We met with Anita Bracalente, the museum’s Registrar, to see and discuss the inner workings of the museum. Anita is a part of the Collections Management team – she is responsible for implementing policies and procedures that relate to caring for collections of the IUAM. Anita was able to answer all of our questions about art storage, accessioning, conservation and the services that are available for students.

SALS + BGSA ended the tour in the viewing room where the IUAM had selected some special flat works for us to view.

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